First Neighborhood Science of the Semester!

Claire Hemingway – Brainy bats: strategies for finding food in the jungle at night

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Bats are remarkable in their diversity. Over 1300 species of bats can be found in every continent, except Antarctica. They come in a variety of different sizes, shapes, and colors They also eat many different things such as fruit, nectar, insects, frogs, and fish. Because many bats have to find their food at night, they have evolved a whole suite of different hunting strategies. The brains of these impressive animals have been shaped for a long time to allow bats to find and remember where food is. I will cover just a handful of examples of the ways in which these animals have come up with solutions for finding food at night.

Science Under the Stars has expanded to include the Austin Public Library! At Neighborhood Science, previous SUTS speakers will present at different library branches around the city a couple times a month. This fun free talk for people of all ages will be held at the Howson Branch Library (2500 Exposition Blvd) on Tuesday, January 28th starting at 7:30pm. Q&A will follow the talk.

**This talk will be held outdoors, so bring a chair and dress warmly!

February 13, Natalie Foster

Dust to dust: the life cycle of stars in our universe

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Astronomer Carl Sagan said, “We are made of star stuff.” Every living thing on this planet (and the universe!) is composed of the remains of stars that existed before the Earth was formed. Our own star, the Sun, continues to drive the processes that sustain us, such as photosynthesis in plants. Why is the Sun so hot? What happens when stars run out of fuel? When will the Sun reach the end of its life? Let’s discover the answers together!

Science Under the Stars is a free public outreach lecture series in Austin, Texas. The talk will be held outdoors at Brackenridge Field Laboratory, 2907 Lake Austin Blvd, Austin, Texas 78703. Here’s the schedule for this month’s event:

  • 6:00 pm: Snacks, kids activities, and displays of local animals and plants found at Brackenridge Field Laboratory will be available.
  • 6:15 pm-6:45 pm: Guided tour of the field lab (wear sturdy shoes and bring water)!
  • 7:00 pm: Settle in, because the talk begins now!
  • 7:45 pm: Q&A with the speaker.

First time visitor? Please read our pet policy & field station rules here, and find parking info and directions here.

Spring 2020 Semester Schedule

It’s that time of the year, mark your calendars! We have four wonderful speakers scheduled for the semester of talks, on the second Thursday of every month:

  • February 13: Natalie Foster – Dust to dust: the life cycle of stars in our universe
  • March 12: Tristan Kubik – Fermented fantasia: a leavenly evening sure to spoil you rotten!
  • April 9: Christina Balentine – Super humankind: how humans have adapted to thrive all over the world
  • May 14: Isaac Miller-Crews – Animal brains!

Science Under the Stars is a free public outreach lecture series in Austin, Texas. Events are held outdoors at Brackenridge Field Laboratory, 2907 Lake Austin Blvd, Austin, Texas 78703. Arrive early for refreshments and fun activities for kids of all ages!

Note: We will post the precise schedules for each event in a separate, event-specific post. Follow this blog or our Facebook page to get event notifications.

First time visitor? Please read our pet policy & field station rules here, and find parking info and directions here.

Thank you!

Thank you all for a great fall semester! We will be back in the spring with more awesome talks! Keep an eye out here and on our Facebook page for the Spring Semester schedule, to be posted in January. 🙂

December 12, Claire Hemingway

Brainy bats: strategies for finding food in the jungle at night

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Bats are remarkable in their diversity. Over 1300 species of bats can be found in every continent, except Antarctica. They come in a variety of different sizes, shapes, and colors They also eat many different things such as fruit, nectar, insects, frogs, and fish. Because many bats have to find their food at night, they have evolved a whole suite of different hunting strategies. The brains of these impressive animals have been shaped for a long time to allow bats to find and remember where food is. I will cover just a handful of examples of the ways in which these animals have come up with solutions for finding food at night.

Science Under the Stars is a free public outreach lecture series in Austin, Texas. The talk will be held outdoors at Brackenridge Field Laboratory, 2907 Lake Austin Blvd, Austin, Texas 78703. Here’s the schedule for this month’s event (please note time change):

  • 6:00 pm: Snacks, kids activities, and displays of local animals and plants found at Brackenridge Field Laboratory will be available.
  • 6:15 pm-6:45 pm: Guided tour of the field lab (wear sturdy shoes and bring water)!
  • 7:00 pm: Settle in, because the talk begins now!
  • 7:45 pm: Q&A with the speaker.

First time visitor? Please read our pet policy & field station rules here, and find parking info and directions here.