Spring Semester Schedule

Mark your calendars! We have four amazing speakers scheduled for this semester:

  • February 8: Spencer Fox – tracking disease outbreaks
  • March 8: Colin Averill – mycorrhizal fungi in forests
  • April 12: Gautam Surya – bird conservation in Northeast India
  • May 10: Robby Deans – adaptations of aquatic insects

Science Under the Stars is a free public outreach lecture series in Austin, Texas. Events are held outdoors at Brackenridge Field Laboratory, 2907 Lake Austin Blvd, Austin, Texas 78703. Arrive early for refreshments and fun activities for kids of all ages!

Note: We will post the precise schedules for each event in a separate, event-specific post. Follow this blog or our Facebook page to get event notifications.

March 8, Colin Averill

Symbiosis between trees and fungi: how mycorrhizae connect our forests

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Mycorrhizal fungi form a symbiosis with the roots of most trees on Earth. These fungal networks enable entire forests to communicate and compete, and new research shows mycorrhizal fungi are central to understanding how forests will respond to global environmental change. Come on out to Science Under the Stars this March to learn about new research showing how these fungi connect forests, as well as new evidence that rapid global environmental change is altering our forests by manipulating the forest fungal microbiome.

Science Under the Stars is a free public outreach lecture series in Austin, Texas. The talk will be held outdoors at Brackenridge Field Laboratory, 2907 Lake Austin Blvd, Austin, Texas 78703. Here’s the schedule for this month’s event:

  • 6:30 pm: Food and displays of local animals and plants found at Brackenridge Field Laboratory will be available. Also, meet with our children’s division for fun activities designed for all ages.
  • 7:00 pm: Find a seat and settle in, because the talk begins now!
  • 7:45 pm: Q&A with the speaker.

February 8 – Spencer Fox

CSI: Disease Detectives

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Between the Ebola epidemic, Zika epidemic, and this year’s bad flu season, it seems every month there is a new disease in the news. Have you ever wondered what public health officials are doing behind the scenes to combat the spread of these diseases? Come on out to Science Under the Stars this February to discover how disease detectives predict and respond to these types of outbreaks, and learn how you can help them out!

Science Under the Stars is a free public outreach lecture series in Austin, Texas. The talk will be held outdoors at Brackenridge Field Laboratory, 2907 Lake Austin Blvd, Austin, Texas 78703. Here’s the schedule for this month’s event:

  • 6:30 pm: Food and displays of local animals and plants found at Brackenridge Field Laboratory will be available. Also, meet with our children’s division for fun activities designed for all ages.
  • 7:00 pm: Find a seat and settle in, because the talk begins now!
  • 7:45 pm: Q&A with the speaker.

December 14, Andrius Dagilis

Ligers and Tigons and Pizzly Bears, Oh My!

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Hybrids between different species are more common than you may believe. Blending two species can create some really amazing animals and plants, but it also has consequences to their evolutionary fitness. Come out to Science Under the Stars this December to learn more about why hybrids are important to both biology and society!

Science Under the Stars is a free public outreach lecture series in Austin, Texas. The talk will be held outdoors at Brackenridge Field Laboratory, 2907 Lake Austin Blvd, Austin, Texas 78703. Here’s the schedule for this month’s event:

  • 6:00 pm: Food and displays of local animals and plants found at Brackenridge Field Laboratory will be available.
  • 6:30 pm: Kid’s activities start! Meet with our children’s division for fun activities designed for all ages.
  • 7:00 pm: Settle in, because the talk begins now!

November 9, Serena Zhao

A fungus among us: mushrooms and beyond

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What does baker’s yeast have in common with the world’s largest organism? What feeds plants through their roots, while related species can survive on bare rock? Fungi!!! Fungi are more closely related to humans than they are to plants, and play a variety of different roles within ecosystems. For instance, fungi can be plant mutualists, animal pathogens, or decomposers. At Science Under the Stars this November, we will explore this amazing Kingdom – the shocking lifestyles, outlandish physiology, and the ways that fungi touch our lives every day.

Science Under the Stars is a free public outreach lecture series in Austin, Texas. The talk will be held outdoors at Brackenridge Field Laboratory, 2907 Lake Austin Blvd, Austin, Texas 78703. Here’s the schedule for this month’s event:

  • 6:00 pm: Food and displays of local animals and plants found at Brackenridge Field Laboratory will be available.
  • 6:30 pm: Kid’s activities start! Meet with our children’s division for fun activities designed for all ages.
  • 7:00 pm: Settle in, because the talk begins now!