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Fall 2012 Speakers

We’re pleased to announce the following dates and speakers for the Science Under The Stars public outreach lecture series.

  • September 13 | Stavana Strutz, West Nile Virus
  • October 11 | Patrick Stinson, How Animals Adapt to Living Around Humans
  • November 8 | Chintan Modi, Vaccine Development and Flourescence
  • December 13 | Michael Gully-Santiago, The Science and Discovery of Stars, Sub-stars, and Planets
All lectures in this series are free, open to the public, and held at 7:30pm outdoors at Brackenridge Field Laboratory, 2907 Lake Austin Blvd, Austin, Texas 78703 (map). In the case of inclement weather, lectures will be held indoors. Arrive early for complimentary refreshments and fun activities for kids of all ages!

Darwin Day

Join us as the Science Under The Stars team helps celebrate Darwin Day at the Texas Memorial Museum. Our very own past speaker Emily Jane McTavish will be giving her excellent talk about the evolution of Texas Longhorns at 3:00pm!

Sunday, February 11, 2012 1-4:45pm

Texas Memorial Museum

2400 Trinity St.

Austin, Texas 78705

© John A. Maisano

Here’s more information from the Texas Memorial Museum’s website:

Join TNSC on Sunday, February 12, 2012 from 1 p.m. to 4:45 p.m. for Darwin Day—a free, family-friendly event celebrating the anniversary of Charles Darwin’s birth.

Travel on your own voyage of discovery as you explore specimens from the TNSC collections similar to those that Darwin saw during his journey while aboard the HMS Beagle, investigate how Darwin’s observations led him to develop fundamental theories of evolution, and learn more about Darwin’s influence on modern day science.

FREE activities for the whole-family include:

Ongoing: Arts and crafts, exploration of TNSC specimens at booths hosted by University of Texas at Austin scientists, and digging in the Fossil Dig Pit

Talks by University of Texas at Austin Scientists:

1:30 p.m.Sassy taste or sexy traits: Stories about co-evolution of female preference and male traits: presented by Silu Wang, Graduate Student, School of Integrative Biology

3:00 p.m.—Longhorn evolution: presented by Emily Jane McTavish, Graduate Student, School of Integrative Biology

In 1831 Charles Darwin set off on a voyage across the Atlantic Ocean on the HMS Beagle. His scientific observations of the amazing diversity of animals he saw in South America were the foundation of his theory of evolution by natural selection. I use the principles of evolution to study Texas Longhorn cattle, another organism that made that long voyage across the Atlantic Ocean—over 300 years before Darwin.

SUTS featured in Daily Texan video

Science Under the Stars (SUTS) is honored to have been featured in a short video from The Daily Texan Online. The video features interviews with SUTS co-organizer Eben Gering and our most recent outreach speaker Nikhil Advani.

Science Under the Stars from The Daily Texan on Vimeo.

2011-2012 schedule!

We’re excited to announce our 2011-2012 season of speakers! All lectures in this series are free, open to the public, and held at 7:30pm outdoors at Brackenridge Field Laboratory, 2907 Lake Austin Blvd, Austin, Texas 78703 (map). In the case of inclement weather, lectures will be held indoors. Arrive early for complimentary refreshments and fun activities for kids of all ages!

    • October 13 | Patricia Salerno
      “Truths and myths behind the Lost World of South America.”
    • November 10 | Nikhil Advani
      “The biological impacts of climate change: Insights from butterflies!”
    • December 8 | Emily McTavish

“Journey to a New World: The Global History of Texas Longhorn Cattle”

  • February 2012 | Jacob Soule
  • March 2012 | Genevieve Smith
  • April 2012 | Jeanine Abrams

Mike Singer

Humans, from the Perspective of a Californian Butterfly

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Back in 1953 my grandmother said: “Butterflies…HAH! Very pretty, but what are they FOR?” I had no answer. In this talk I will turn the question around and ask from the butterfly’s perspective: “Humans…very big and clumsy…. but what are they FOR?” We might think that the answer is just that humans are BAD, but no, it’s more complicated than that. Without thinking about it, we humans create puzzles for butterflies to solve. Sometimes they succeed and sometimes they don’t.